Journey: Advanced Praise

January 10, 2017

ADVANCE PRAISE FOR JOURNEY


“Author Stephen Foreman’s electrifying Journey takes us on a wild, emotional ride with three mesmerizing, unforgettable characters in the Old West of the 1830s. Stephen’s prowess as both an author and screenwriter are in full display as we actually see and feel every moment of the adventure. Unlike most westerns, the title character of Journey is a courageous, irrepressible young woman whose indomitable spirit comes alive like a flaming arrow on each page. Set against the backdrop of social challenges such as slavery and intolerance that still resonate today, Journey is a spellbinding page turner that reminds us of how captivating a great story and characters can be in the hands of a master story teller. What a great book—can’t wait to the see the movie.”

 

— Stephen Simon, producer of the films Somewhere in Time, What Dreams May Come, and All The Right Moves


“Raw, gritty, unflinching, yet still somehow tender. A gripping tale about freedom, identity, heritage. A Western unlike any you’ve read before.”

 

— Casey Scieszka, author of To Timbuktu: Nine Countries, Two People, One True Story


“This stirring tale thrusts the reader into the 1830s of the West. It’s an eye-opening depiction of the savagery and mag¬nificence of the period. It redefines and reanimates our con¬ventional notions of the Western saga. The characters are viv¬idly drawn. The writing style is almost painterly. It’s visual and seems like a firsthand account of actual events. Mr. Fore¬man transports us to a world that is recognizable and at the same time fresh and enthralling.”

 

— Tony Shalhoub, Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning actor

 

“Although identified as “a western” in its subtitle, this briskly paced novel by Stephen Foreman bursts the traditional bounds of the genre. Set in a harsh Southwest still beyond the edge of the law, its vividly constructed characters take the reader on a wild horseback ride through rugged country, villainy, nature’s ferocity, and the evil of slavery on the frontier. Few will forget the journey.”

 

— E. Donnall Thomas Jr., author of How Sports¬men Saved the World and Montana Streams, Peaks and Prairies


“Journey, set in the American West before the Civil War, tells the vivid story of three people who struggle to make lives in a still raw and brutal country: Journey is an astonishingly capa¬ble sixteen year old whose background is a mystery and who seems to have been all but born on horseback; Reuben Moon, part Mexican and part Apache, a tracker and a hunter who carries within him the gifts of the mountains and the woods and may also be Journey’s father; and Esau Burdock, a wealthy slave trader who was born poor and didn’t forget it. The land was rich with wild food and wilder animals, including a moun¬tain lion as vivid as Journey herself. The book’s considerable power comes from Foreman’s deep understanding of an America two hundred years ago, run on a slave economy. This is a first rate American novel with haunting characters in the spirit of Larry McMurtry.”

 

— David Freeman, screenwriter, is also the author of A Hollywood Education, One of Us, It’s All True, and other books


“A book of historical importance, as Journey is, usually delivers the stuff that satisfies readers. But Stephen Foreman’s achieve¬ment with Journey is to combine historically accurate facts with riveting fiction, creating a book of tremendous impor¬tance. Read, enjoy, and reflect on Journey’s journey and her emancipation. I loved this book!”

 

— Joseph B. Healy, editor of When Bears Attack


“Reading this book I was swept into a compelling narrative as raw and bold as the old Southwest. We forget how very differ¬ent we are, yet how connected we can be by events bigger than ourselves. Foreman’s story starts with the meteor shower that stunned and shocked everyone whose eyes were opened to the sky on a November night in 1833. And we cannot help but ride along with the girl who stares at the sky from the back of her paint pony. It was a seminal moment in the lives of all who witnessed the Leonid meteor shower of November 18, 1833. All over the continent eyes were turned to the heavens in wide wonder and fear. This story opens with Journey sitting on a paint pony beneath an angry sky. She wonders what it is going to mean and we do too, swept along with her into Foreman’s epic of incest, injustice and instinct.”

 

— Gary Lewis, host of Frontier Unlimited, author of John Nosler Going Ballistic


“The boundaries of color and caste have been breached, tweaked, and traversed in these United States of America even before its formal inception as a nation. And Stephen Foreman fuses compassion, astuteness, and vigorous prose to bring these elements to an antebellum western whose heroic values are at once familiar and fresh. You can almost feel the prairie breezes and night chills on your skin along with Journey’s heroine, who fears nothing in her past or present.”

 

— Gene Seymour EUGENE SEYMOUR spent more than 30 years in daily journalism, 20 of them as a movie and music critic. He is the author of Jazz the Great American Art and was a former chair of the New York Film Critics Circle. He has contributed articlless and essays to The Nation, Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe BookForum and CNN.com, This year, he served as a fiction judge for the Kirkus Book Awards and is working on a collection of essays.


STEPHEN FOREMAN IS AN AMAZING WRITER WHO TAKES YOU ON A JOURNEY WITH HIS WORDS. HE WRITES ABOUT THE HUMAN CONDITION AND HOW WE WILD ANIMALS TAKE CARE OF ONE ANOTHER IN THE WILD. HIS WORDS EXPLORE BIG THEMES AND THE WAY THAT LIFE BINDS US TOGETHER AND TEARS US APART. READ THIS BOOK.

 

- Gary Lennon - Producer: Power; Producer: Orange Is The New Black


“After reading Journey, no one will think the same way about the Old West or slavery. This beautifully told tale of love, hate, and courage, with its superb descriptions of western landscape, complex and nuanced characters, vengeance and forgiveness, is a fine work of art.”

 

— Luke Salisbury, author of Hollywood and & Sunset, The Cleveland Indian, and The Answer Is

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